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Tim Free

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Reply with quote  #1 
Just starting out on a new Zentapper and should I go with Parallel or Mirrored tuning? That is, should i go with the bass-bottom it comes with and therefore the logical hand forms look the same for both hands by-eye, but each hand plays it using different fingers, thus hands move left and right together in parallel, similar to a piano player?
    Or, the less-logical "looking" Mirrored method where both hands are playing the same shape using the same fingers, and the hands move towards/away from each other when playing identical shapes. ?   Like accordian.

As I'm just starting out there is nothing to "un-learn."
Is there any advantage to mirrored playing?

Changing the strings around for me, would be a quick change and if the long term is worth it...but i note that the Megatar and Zentapper don't come this way as any option.

YOUR OPINION IS WANTED.

Goals I'm trying to achieve:
1. I am leaning towards mirrored, as the identical patterns-per-finger appeals to my wee brain and ;
2. Don't want to "un-learn" anything 5 years from now when I discover some advantage-or-other of the opposite style.
3. It's tuned in straight-fourths. I want to stay with straight-fourths.

Thanks!



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peace, and Music.   
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JohnAbrams

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Reply with quote  #2 
I'm wondering the same thing and can't get anyone to answer either.  I'm building an uncrossed 14 string tapper but in the mean time I'm starting to learn on a pair of 6 strings - not at the same time - one for bass and one for treble.  I'm playing treble with my right hand which wasn't my first choice.  I started playing treble with my left hand because that's the hand that was always in that position when I was playing normal guitar but I've found my right hand is actually faster so I switched that.  Then I watched a Polish musician playing a specially constructed double neck guitar, playing treble with his right hand on the "top" neck which was tuned standard but his hand really gets scrunched up and I don't see how he can play familiar chords at all.  I've just switched over one of the guitars to left handed for the treble side - I'm playing in cello position, by the way - and it makes a lot of sense.  I'm essentially playing the treble left-handed - that is, with my right hand - which means I can chord the same way on the treble as I do on the bass and since I've got the bass tuned exactly one octave below the treble, everything is symmetrical. I understand where the Polish guy is coming from since he started tapping on a 6 string in normal position.  Changing would mean he'd have to start over from scratch, but I have nothing to unlearn.

Thanks for your indulgence. Writing this all down clarified it for me.
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garyopenhill

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Reply with quote  #3 
i'd say parallell is better for most people. The identical pattern thing in mirrored doesn't seem to work in real life. I guess its because you "see" the pattern in the brain before you play it, and so parallell then actually gives the true "identical" pattern version, but mirrored...well the brain has to mirror it! Thats my personal experience having played both, and opinion. I guess the muscle memory thing is an argument, but at least for me it doesnt work like that.
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JohnAbrams

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Reply with quote  #4 
Thanks so much for the input.  I was worried about forming chords in an unfamiliar manner - trying to form an e form, for instance, with the right hand with the strings in parallel - and then I remembered that the great folk guitarist Elizabeth Cotten played left-handed on a right handed guitar without switching the strings.  I'm going to watch her YouTube videos and see how she deals with chords.  She also picked the bass with her fingers and the treble with her thumb showing that it depends a lot on what you're used to.

Thanks again.
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